You can’t skip Day Two: Where the magic happens

Day two, or whatever that middle space is for your own process, is when you’re ‘in the dark’—the door has closed behind you. You’re too far in to turn around and not close enough to the end to see the light.” —Brené Brown in Rising Strong

Brené Brown, author of Rising Strong, leads and participates in three-day workshops that encourage people to dare greatly and accept vulnerability. On Day One, people arrive bright with curiosity and anticipation. Day One is easy. But not Day Two. Day Two is hard. That is when participants really need to delve into the “unavoidable uncertainty, vulnerability, and discomfort of the creative process.”

No matter where people come from, or how much money they make, or what level of experience they have, everyone finds Day Two of the workshops challenging. Everyone experiences the doubt and discomfort that make up the middle space. Sometimes people want to give up and flee. They want to skip all the difficulties but yet, somehow, miraculously arrive at a happy ending.

But you can’t skip Day Two.

“The middle is messy, but it’s also where the magic happens.”

Daring greatly to fill the empty pages on Day Two

Daring greatly to fill the empty pages on Day Two

Day Two takes many metaphorical forms. It’s the time of not knowing in between times of knowing. It can be the journey between the bright curiosity and anticipation at the outset of a project and the satisfaction of its completion, as in Brown’s workshops. It can also be the painful struggle between tragedy and triumph.

Day Two lives in the space after death or divorce and before life re-created in a new way. We find Day Two in the scorching pain of labour, after the first twing of contraction and before the birth of a child. Writers know Day Two well. Our Day Two is the long, doubt-filled period between Idea and Book.

There is a big Day Two coming up this weekend for those who celebrate Easter. Those who don’t celebrate Easter can look to it as an example too.

The Saturday that follows Good Friday, might look like an empty day, but it’s an important day to contemplate, because it’s the part of the story that we most often need to bring to mind. It represents all the difficult times we face when we don’t yet know about the joy to come. In Jesus’ time, on the Saturday following his death people only knew grief. They thought he’d be lost to history forever. They couldn’t have imagined that thousands of years later we’d still be talking about the guy.

During our times in between when we can’t see the happy ending—whether those times come after a divorce, or while working on a school project, or while waiting to hear if we got a job—Day Two reminds us that wonderful things beyond our wildest imaginings could be around the corner.

The time in between is a messy time of grief, or doubt, or confusion, or anger. On Day Two we do all the work without knowing where it’s going. It’s not fun, but you can’t skip it either. It’s where the magic happens.

Day Two sustains us and reminds us to keep a flicker of hope alive.

wishing-for-wind

 

 

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About Arlene Somerton Smith

Writer, laughing thinker, miner of inspirational insights, sports fan, and community volunteer

Posted on March 22, 2016, in Arlene Smith, Arlene Somerton Smith, good faith, How do you define success?, Inspiration, life, Living life to the fullest, metaphor, modern faith, progressive christianity, spirituality and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. Linda Williams

    Enjoyed your ‘Day Two’ Blog. One of the best ever. Well written, thought provoking stuff. Never thought about the Saturday in between, and how it’s a metaphor as we tackle the unknown. Thank you.

  2. Elizabeth Adams

    my dear, thank you for this…….so very meaningful for me today….

    On Tue, Mar 22, 2016 at 11:14 AM, Somerton Smith wrote:

    > Arlene Somerton Smith posted: “”Day two, or whatever that middle space is > for your own process, is when you’re ‘in the dark’—the door has closed > behind you. You’re too far in to turn around and not close enough to the > end to see the light.” —Brené Brown in Rising Strong Brené Brown, a” >

  3. I needed this today, my friend……so very meaningful……I wrote something, called “Middle”….hope it’s as rich for you as your writing always is for me……

    http://hindsfeet-birdseyeview.blogspot.com/2015/05/middle.html

    thank you, so very very much….
    Liz ~*

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